BoJack Horseman is the Worst

May 14, 2017

 

 

The BoJack Horseman Show is one of the best shows on netflix. For those of you who haven't watch this "dramedy", this show is an adult animated Netflix series which features an anthropomorphic horse named BoJack who has many problems. He is doing his best to make a comeback after the death of the “Full House” sitcom knock-off he once starred in called “Horsin’ Around”. BoJack is played by Will Arnett and is accompanied by his talent agent slash on-and-off girlfriend Princess Carolyn, played by Amy Sedaris, and his only true friend Todd is played by Aaron Paul.

 

Many people, such as myself, love this show because it is so honest and realistic. It does not hide away from the true facets of depression. Even though this show is amazing, it's protagonist, BoJack, is the absolute worst. 

 

Why is BoJack so bad? BoJack often self-sabotages relationship. He also has problems with substance abuse and self-esteem. Not to mention, he's just a plain ol' asshole. But I can't get enough of him.

 

I analyzed BoJack for one of my communications classes to prove amazing the show is and how much BoJack needs help.To analyze this show, I used a method from our class textbook called the Pentad. It's a form of rhetorical analysis that allowed me to understand the themes within BoJack Horseman and how it teaches its audience how one ought to or ought not act.

 

Based on the pentad, it is clear to see that BoJack is an extremely sensitive, yet complex character. BoJack’s negative persona and dialogue affects its audiences on a moral and action-based level. From a moral perspective, BoJack teaches those with depression how to not act while influencing audience members without depression perception of what depression looks like. However, through BoJack’s negative actions, he encourages his audience members to take positive actions.  

 

Even though BoJack is a simple anthropometric horse, he influences and, in some cases, helps his audience. For many, binging this Netflix series helps them feel less alone and more accepted because this show does an excellent job of telling the audience how complicated and difficult having depression can be. It clearly influences audience members with and without depression by teaching them how to not act within society through BoJack’s self-sabotaging and self-destructive behavior. Best of all, his actions encourage all audience members to take action by seeking help (if need be) and educating themselves about mental illness. Personally, I look forward to seeing how BoJack progresses as a character in the fourth season come April.

 

If you are interested in reading the full analysis you can do so here.

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Elexia Johnson
Creatively  Driven

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